Bulahdelah Central School celebrates NAIDOC Week

Grace Burke enjoys sharing her culture.
Grace Burke enjoys sharing her culture.

 

A PERFORMANCE by the student Indigenous Dance Group was a highlight of NAIDOC Week Celebrations at Bulahdelah Central School last week.

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The young performers, who proudly represent the Worimi, Dunghutti and Biripi tribes, shared their cultural history through dance, language and song.

Group member, Dakota Edgerton, said their performances promote a sense of unity by teaching others about their culture.

“I am very proud of my culture and I enjoy sharing it,” she said.

“Each of the dances and songs show there is a lot to learn in terms of language, storytelling and traditions and our performances help other people understand more about it as well.”

NAIDOC Week runs from 2-9 July, and this year’s message is Our Languages Matter.

In the Myall Coast Region, many place names are linked to Indigenous language words.

The dance group members said in the Kattang language used by the Worimi tribes, Bulahdelah means ‘Place Where Two Rivers Meet’, being the Myall and Crawford Rivers.

Karuah also derives its name from an Aboriginal word, and has several possible meanings, including ’Wild Plum’, ’Plenty Fish’ and ‘Big Water Hole’.

Around 120 Indigenous languages are still spoken throughout Australia, but many are at risk of being lost.

The dance group hopes this year’s NAIDOC theme will raise an awareness of the importance of language in their Culture.

“It is so important to share the songs and dances to keep the language alive for future generations,” group member Abby Fenner said.

“A lot of young people do not get the opportunity to share their culture, and I feel very honoured to have a part in keeping these traditions going.”

The dance group has been running for three years and showcases the talents of Indigenous students from Years 4-12.

 

By Daniel SAHYOUN

Indigenous Dance Group: Dakota Edgerton, Shayla Nevison, Sally Curnow, Tahlia Tomkins, Abby Fenner, Aaliyah Paulson-Ruprecht, Grace Burke and Taylah Tassell.
Indigenous Dance Group: Dakota Edgerton, Shayla Nevison, Sally Curnow, Tahlia Tomkins, Abby Fenner, Aaliyah Paulson-Ruprecht, Grace Burke and Taylah Tassell.

 

Indigenous Dance Group: Shayla Nevison,Tahlia Tomkins,Taylah Tassell, Grace Burke, Harrison Hughes, Abby Fenner, Sally Curnow, Dakota Edgerton and Aaliyah Paulson-Ruprecht.
Indigenous Dance Group: Shayla Nevison,Tahlia Tomkins,Taylah Tassell, Grace Burke, Harrison Hughes, Abby Fenner, Sally Curnow, Dakota Edgerton and Aaliyah Paulson-Ruprecht.

 

Abby Fenner and Dakota Edgerton proudly represent the Worimi Tribe.
Abby Fenner and Dakota Edgerton proudly represent the Worimi Tribe.

 

Indigenous Dance Group: Taylah Tassell, Grace Burke and Daisie Wheaton.
Indigenous Dance Group: Taylah Tassell, Grace Burke and Daisie Wheaton.

 

Shayla Nevison, Tahlia Tomkins, Aaliyah Paulson-Ruprecht and Grace Burke.
Shayla Nevison, Tahlia Tomkins, Aaliyah Paulson-Ruprecht and Grace Burke.

 

Cultural Pride: Dakota Edgerton, Shayla Nevison and Tahlia Tomkins.
Cultural Pride: Dakota Edgerton, Shayla Nevison and Tahlia Tomkins.

 

Cultural Pride: Taylah Tassell, Grace Burke and Sally Curnow.
Cultural Pride: Taylah Tassell, Grace Burke and Sally Curnow.

 

Dakota Edgerton, Sally Curnow and Aaliyah Paulson-Ruprecht prepare for their dance performance.
Dakota Edgerton, Sally Curnow and Aaliyah Paulson-Ruprecht prepare for their dance performance.

 

Three Generations: Jason, Lyn and Leah Slockee from Karuah.
Three Generations: Jason, Lyn and Leah Slockee from Karuah.

 

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