Daffodil Day gives hope for a future free from cancer

Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather and her mum Kylie hope for a future free from cancer.
Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather and her mum Kylie hope for a future free from cancer.

 

KYLIE Mather said she was “over the moon” when she found out her daughter’s cancer was in remission.

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“When Sophie was diagnosed, the doctors told us she only had a 60 percent chance of beating it,” Kylie said.

“There are no words that can really explain just how happy we felt when we found out she was clear.”

Eleven-year old Sophie was diagnosed with medulloblastoma when she was just seven years old.

She endured six weeks of radiation treatment, followed by six months of heavy chemotherapy.

During treatment, Kylie said the family had to live apart so Sophie’s brothers and sisters could still attend school.

“I stayed at Ronald McDonald House because we lived so far away, I needed to be close to Sophie,” Kylie said.

“It had a huge impact on the whole family, and still does.”

The Bulahdelah mum of six said although Sophie has beaten the cancer, she still suffers side effects of the radiation treatment.

The Cancer Council estimates that every day more than 350 Australians find out they have a life-threatening cancer, and one in two Australian men and women will be diagnosed with cancer by the age of 85.

The survival rate for many common cancers has increased by 30 percent in the last two decades, but the Cancer Council said there is still a long way to go.

Friday 25 August marks the 31st Daffodil Day in Australia, which gives hope for a future free from cancer.

The Cancer Council hopes to raise $2.1 million to fund vital cancer research, continue their cancer prevention programs and provide support services.

Kylie said she is so thankful for the support her family has received.

“You are just forever grateful for what other people do for you,” she said.

Daffodil Day pins can be purchased from retailers throughout the region to help the Cancer Council’s fight against cancer.

 

By Daniel SAHYOUN

 

Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather and her mum Kylie.
Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather and her mum Kylie.

 

Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather and her mum Kylie. (left) Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather shares hope for a cancer free future. (right)
Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather and her mum Kylie. (left)
Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather shares hope for a cancer free future. (right)

 

Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather shares hope for a cancer free future.
Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather shares hope for a cancer free future.

 

Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather shares hope for a cancer free future.
Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather shares hope for a cancer free future.

 

Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather shares hope for a cancer free future.
Daffodil Day: Sophie Hill-Mather shares hope for a cancer free future.

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