Increased snake activity in Port Stephens during the warmer months

Eastern Brown Snake
Eastern Brown Snake

 

WITH the warm weather comes all kinds of wildlife that we don’t commonly see during the winter months.

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While some are cute and cuddly, others may give you an unexpected fright.

There is a common misconception that our resident legless reptiles, snakes, intend harm.

Local reptile enthusiast, Mr Dylan Stuart told News Of The Area, “The truth is they are shy animals who would rather avoid being seen and won’t go out of their way to hurt people.”

Another common belief is that where there are young snakes the mother must be close by.

Mr Stuart said, “When snakes are born they are completely on their own. They don’t stay by their mothers side they are completely independent.”

Port Stephens has an active snake population with Diamond Pythons, Red-Bellied Black, Eastern Brown, Marsh and Green Tree snakes among the most common in the area.

A snakes first priority is to seek shelter to avoid confrontation.

However, if a snake feels threaten it will defend itself.

Most bites occur when people try killing the snake or removing it without proper handling training.

It is highly illegal to kill any snake as they are protected in NSW by the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016.

Local snake relocation worker, Mr Justin Lantry said, “It would be ideal to move persons and pets away and monitor from a safe distance. Get photos if possible as it helps with identification, and contact a catcher for advice or relocation.”

“Staying calm and remaining still will result in the snake staying calm as well” Mr Lantry said.

Keeping a clean and tidy yard is the simplest way to reduce the chance of unwanted reptilian visitors during the warmer months.

More information on snakes and what to do if you are in their presence go to

www.environment.nsw.gov.au/questions/snake-removal or www.environment.nsw.gov.au/topics/animals-and-plants/native-animals/native-animal-facts/snakes

 

By Kelly MAY

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