Kingfish Aquaculture Enterprise at Port Stephens creates sustainable alternative for menus

Marine Biologist David Whyte a of Huon Aquaculture explaining the environmental impacts of the sea pens in Providence Bay. Photo by Marian Sampson
Marine Biologist David Whyte a of Huon Aquaculture explaining the environmental impacts of the sea pens in Providence Bay. Photo by Marian Sampson

 

THE Department of Fisheries and Huon Aquaculture enterprise in Providence Bay harvested the first Yellowtail Kingfish from the enterprise coinciding with the Port Stephens Love Seafood festival.

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Locals may have noticed the Huon Aquaculture work boat Omaha at Nelson Bay Marina.

The Omaha has capacity to lift the sea pen mooring grid for inspection and maintenance, including removal of natural fouling on grid lines.

This maintenance is likely to assist with buoyancy of the grid buoys meaning that they will sit higher and be more visible on the surface.

Marine fauna monitoring is constant, with dolphins being the predominant fauna recorded in the last four months.

An updated water and sediment quality report which is being developed by an accredited laboratory, the University of Newcastle and an independent consultant from samples and readings from both under the sea pens, and on the edge of the lease, and at control sites in Providence Bay, will be released shortly.

David Whyte of Huon Aquaculture told News Of The Area, “We currently have two pens in the lease and are able to increase this to 12 pens.”

“An additional two pens will be installed in the next two months.”

“The pens … are secured by 53 two tonne anchors and can be moved within the lease site so that they don’t sit over any one part of the seabed for an extended period of time,” he said.

Chef Ben Way of Little Beach Boathouse said, “The decision to have their fish farm here in Port Stephens is very exciting for me as a chef and business owner and also a credit to the region.”

“After receiving initial samples direct from the first release of produce I can firmly say this product is first class.”

“Sustainable aquaculture is imperative to the future of the fishing industry and Huon are one of the leaders in this field,” he said.

 

By Marian SAMPSON

 

The Port Stephens Aquaculture lease.
The Port Stephens Aquaculture lease.

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