NSW Rocks is the new craze fostering kindness

Jamie Offen with his rocks.  Photo by Natalie Offen
Jamie Offen with his rocks. Photo by Natalie Offen

 

 

NSW Rocks is a new phenomenon sweeping the state and particularly popular with schoolkids and their parents.

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It began in the United States as an idea by one woman to spread some kindness and the craze is now gradually sweeping the globe.

In Australia, it began in WA and has now caught on in the eastern states too.

The idea is to paint small rocks, acrylics or permanent markers work best, and to safely hide them in parks or other outdoor locations.

NSW Rocks operates via Facebook (called NSW Rocks), which explains the rules and what to do.

It’s important to write the group name on the reverse, so people know which group the rock came from.

When you have made your rock drop, you list it on the page so that others can then go hunting for them.

Similarly, when you find some, you post them on the page so that the artist knows they have been found.

You can choose to either keep them or hide them again.

It’s a similar concept to Geocaching, which is also a worldwide trend.

The idea behind the painted rocks is to foster a sense of kindness and of giving to others.

It brings happiness and helps to connect people around the globe at a time when we could use a bit more love.

The added benefit is that it gets kids away from their gadgets and out getting fresh air and exercise.

Local mum Natalie Offen and her son, James, are NSW Rocks converts.

Natalie told News Of The Area, “It’s fun for all ages, toddlers to adults. It’s great to see your rocks travel to different places, including interstate.”

“We hid some around Dutchie’s playground. A friend’s daughter found them. She then re-hid them and a boy from James’ school found them yesterday,” Natalie said.

 

By Sarah STOKES

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