Port Stephens Community supports disengaged youth building project

Warrick Lilly of Lodge Cornucopia presents a cheque to fund the project to Real Futures representative Marian Sampson.
Warrick Lilly of Lodge Cornucopia presents a cheque to fund the project to Real Futures representative Marian Sampson.

 

BEING able to say I can, rather than I can’t is important to young people.

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The community has banded together with Tomaree High School to create a major “I can” moment for a group of disengaged students at Tomaree High School participating in a building project which was designed to provide real life and work skills to students and expose them to new opportunities.

The project has been funded by Port Stephens Council, Lodge Cornucopia, Masonicare, The Lions Club of Salamander Bay and the school’s Parents and Citizens Association, and was driven by the Real Futures Foundation.

This week Lodge Cornucopia presented the Real Futures Foundation with a cheque for $2,000.

Warrick Lilly of Lodge Cornucopia told News Of The Area, “We really believe in what Real Futures does for our young people.”

“Giving young people the ability to believe in themselves is very important, and that’s what Real Futures does for Port Stephens’ youth.”

“The Lodge is proud to be able to contribute to this project,” he said.

The project, which spanned two years, is finally complete.

The Brick and Block Layers Association provided a trainer, State Training Services liaised with all parties to help make the build a reality, and major sponsor business Valley Homes supplied the building materials and technical drawings needed for the build.

It includes an Indigenous garden which was funded through a Port Stephens Council Aboriginal Projects grant.

The school’s Indigenous students named the garden and barbecue area Gaaramabaa which means “shade of the tree place”.

This name encompasses the purposes for the garden being a quiet space, learning space, meeting place and a place to share food.

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