Port Stephens students celebrate National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day

 

Quade Riddle giving the Didgeridoo all the breath he can muster.(left) Louie Bovill is proud to share his culture. (right)
Quade Riddle giving the Didgeridoo all the breath he can muster.(left)
Louie Bovill is proud to share his culture. (right)

 

STUDENTS around Port Stephens celebrated National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day last week.

Karuah & District RSL Club
Modern Media: Advertise with News Of The Area and you get your ad in 1) in Print, 2) on the News Website (like this ad), and 3) on our Social Media news site. A much more efficient way to advertise. Reach a HUGE audience for a LOW price TODAY! Call us on 02 4983 2134. Or [email protected]

Or CLICK FOR ADVERT QUOTE

Children’s Day, celebrated for the 29th year in 2017, is a time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families to celebrate their culture and pass important stories and learning onto all children, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous.

On this day, all Australians can show their support for and learn about the crucial impact that community, culture and family play in the life of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child.

The theme for Children’s Day 2017 is “Value Our Rights, Respect Our Culture, Bring Us Home”.

This year, Children’s Day recognises the 20th anniversary of the Bringing Them Home Report, and the many benefits children experience when they are raised with strong connections to family and culture.

The Bringing them Home Report was a landmark exposure of the complete disregard for the basic human rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, families and communities through the policies and practices of what is known as the Stolen Generations.

National Children’s Day, works to acknowledge the past and work for a better tomorrow.

Ms Michelle Bovill, proud Wiradjuri woman, joined the children at one of Port Stephens registered Children’s Day events, a week of celebrations at Medowie Community Preschool.

Over the week, the children learnt about Indigenous instruments and music making, Aboriginal language groups, art through mural painting and the very popular, cooking bush tucker.

Ms Bovill told News Of The Area, “I am proud to come from the oldest culture, 60 thousand years and counting, proven through archaeological evidence.”

“I am honoured to share our culture with the community, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, so our children can be raised with the spirit of reconciliation, and with acknowledgement and pride for Australia’s First Nation peoples.”

 

By Rachael VAUGHAN

Leave a Reply

Top