Vandalism Blights Birubi Point Conservation Area

.Information shelter graffitied.
.Information shelter graffitied.

Vandals at Birubi Point are ruining valuable conservation work to a native habitat.

The land, owned by the Worimi Local Aboriginal Council and managed by the Office of Environment and Heritage, is part of a conservation project to promote the regeneration of native flora in the area.

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Volunteers have recently spent a great deal of time cultivating this environment.

Unfortunately this valuable work is being undone by persons unknown who could be opposed to the project.

Signs and fencing are repeatedly torn down and vandalised.

The information shelter has been completely graffitied.

Worst of all is the poisoning with illegal weed spray and chainsawing of trees.

Duncan Scott-Lawson, a Ranger with the Office of Environment and Heritage, based at the Nelson Bay office, said that the police have been informed.

“Unfortunately these cowardly acts are being carried out at night.”

“As native trees in a conservation area, they are allowed to grow to their natural height.”

It would appear that some people are not happy with this and are taking matters into their own hands.

Mr Scott-Lawson told News Of The Area, “Leaflets have been delivered to at least five hundred houses and we have also had community meetings to inform local people of the project.”

Birubi Point holds Aboriginal significance as an important ceremonial and burial site for the local Worimi people in times past.

A lot of the archaeologically significant material has been built over but there are still some identifiable sites.

It is therefore culturally sacred and has been identified as an Aboriginal Place.

It is still used to teach the younger generations about their ancestors and the culture of their people.

In view of this, the vandalism is extremely disrespectful to the traditional owners as well as spoiling the area for everyone.

By Sarah STOKES

Signs and fencing vandalised.
Signs and fencing vandalised.

Duncan Scott-Lawson with a chainsawed tree.
Duncan Scott-Lawson with a chainsawed tree.

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